Crisis

What to do in a Crisis

What is a crisis? Crisis can mean different things to different people. When we use the term crisis we mean overwhelming thoughts and/or feelings to either hurt yourself, hurt somebody else or you are planning or attempting suicide.

Click here to go straight to support for the under 18s

Depending on how severe the situation is for you (or someone you care for) will decide on who it is best to contact. The key aim is to get to the right help at the right time that supports you to deal with the situation as safely and as calmly as possible.  There is no step by step approach to accessing crisis support, each situation is as unique as the individual experiencing a crisis.  The severity of the impact upon the person will determine which organisation or service listed below you contact.

 

Where there is danger to life – A&E or 999
If you urgently need specialist advice the Initial Response Service offer 24/7 support and information for Sunderland, South Tyneside & Gateshead 0303 123 1145
NHS 111 Can discuss concerns and signpost to appropriate support
Has the GP been made aware of the situation? Contact the surgery and speak to someone
When there is a need to talk 24 Hour Support it available from the Samaritans on FREE phone number: 116 123 If you are hearing or speech impaired you can dial 18001 before the Helpline number to use Text Relay service
Is there a family member, friend or colleague who can be there?
Starts with YOU having the conversation….you being there supporting the person. Sometimes listening and being there is the support someone needs
Support for the under 18s

Having thoughts about wanting to die and suicide are painful and can effect anyone of us. The Young People’s Pathway identifies the steps that can be taken to access support. It has been created for young people up to the age of 18, and it explains clearly the support that is available. There is no step by step approach to accessing crisis support, each situation is as unique as the individual experiencing a crisis. If you are worried about a young person, or worried about your own thoughts, please tell someone who you can trust, or contact any of the numbers from the Pathway.

Where there is danger to life – A&E or 999
If you urgently need specialist advice the Initial Response Service offer 24/7 support and information for Sunderland, South Tyneside & Gateshead 0303 123 1145
 NHS 111 Can discuss concerns and signpost to appropriate support
If you have concerns about the safety or welfare of a child or young person you must contact Children’s Safeguarding on 0191 520 5560 (available 8.30am to 5.15pm Monday – Thursday, 8.30am to 4.45pm Friday) Or the Out of Hours Team on 0191 520 5552 (also available 24 hours Saturday and Sunday). Children and Young Peoples Service (CYPS) 0191 5665500 For information and support. Open Monday – Friday 8am – 8pm 
Has the GP been made aware of the situation? Contact the surgery and speak to someone
When there is a need to talk 24 Hour Support is available from: Childline: 0800 1111 Papyrus HOPELine UK – 0800 068 4141 or text 07786209697 Samaritans on FREE phone number: 116 123 If you are hearing or speech impaired you can dial 18001 before the Helpline number to use Text Relay service
Is there a family member, friend, teacher or trusted professional who can be there?
Starts with YOU having the conversation….you being there supporting the person. Sometimes listening and being there is the support someone needs

Suicide is the act of ending one’s own life on purpose.Most people thinking about suicide do not want to die; they want to stop the pain and distress they are experiencing.

If you feel suicidal, don’t hide it, talk to someone you trust or phone a local service or helpline
Suicide affects all of us, no matter our age, gender or culture.

If they have made a previous suicide attempt.

If they talk about ‘not wanting to go on’, ‘ending it all, ‘not wanting to wake up’ or  ‘wanting to die’

If they can’t see a way out of their current crisis / distress / situation.

If they have been through stressful life events or have experienced a trauma or significant loss and don’t seem to be coping.

If they are drinking, smoking or using drugs more than usual.

If they have started putting things in order, e.g. sorting life insurance, wills, pet care or childcare or giving away their belongings

If they show noticeable changes in behaviour, appearance or mood; (distracted, sad, distant, not taking care of themselves) or a sudden uplift in mood following a period of depression.

By talking about our suicidal thoughts with someone we can share our feelings and concerns and through this, we can identify ways forward.  It is comforting to know that we are not alone and that help is available. 

  • Talking about suicide saves lives
  • If you are worried about someone talk to them, it could save their life

Together we can make a difference!

If you are worried about a friend, colleague, neighbour or family member they may really appreciate you asking how they are. You don’t have to be able to solve their problem, or even to completely understand it, but listening to what they have to say will let them know you care.

If you are feeling suicidal, the best thing you can do is talk.  Speak to someone you trust or make contact with a service who will offer you support.  

If you are worried that someone is suicidal, ask them. It could save their life! 

If you want to know how to help – Suicide prevention training can help you save a life!